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Preaching Puts You In Your Place

I’ve not met too many pastors who come skipping into the pulpit on Sunday convinced they have the next “Don’t Waste Your Life” or “Sinners In the Hands of an Angry God” in their hot little hands. At least any who’ve been out of seminary for like a week. The reason why is that preaching is supposed to put a pastor in his place, and remind him every Sunday morning that he has one job to do that he didn’t get to write the job description for. Here’s three ways preaching puts us in our place, and why it should.

Praying Like Breathing

Don’t worry, this is not another article on the nature and effect of prayer as a spiritual discipline in the life of believers. For that, read “Prayer” by Tim Keller, “Recapturing the Wonder” by Mike Cosper, “Habits of Grace” by David Mathis or “A Praying Life” by Paul Miller. What I want to briefly discuss is two practical aspects of praying and why “prayer without ceasing” should become as natural as the daily conversations you have with friends and loved ones.

Singing the Psalms

From Moses (Psalm 90) all the way through the 18th Century, the Psalms were the primary prayer book and the hymnal of the people of God. If you wanted to know how to grow in your intimacy with God, if you wanted a glimpse into God’s heart, if you wanted to learn how to pray, throughout the ages, most pastors would have had the same answer: “Work your way through the Psalms, and let the Psalms do their work upon you.”

Back from Sabbatical: 10 Reflections Upon Reentry

I realize that not all of us have the luxury of taking a sabbatical 5-7 years into our church plants, but I would encourage all pastors reading this to begin to have serious conversations with your elders or leadership teams about the necessity of sabbaticals for your spiritual, emotional and physical health.With that said, Melissa and I decided to jot down a few reflections (in no particular order) which we hope might be helpful to you whether a sabbatical is coming soon or later.

Resource Roundup #51

Almost 1 in 5 women in Japanese prisons is a senior. Their crimes are usually minor—9 in 10 senior women who’ve been convicted were found guilty of shoplifting. This week's Roundup features a piece that demonstrates just why community is so important for human flourishing. We've also got resources on paper airplanes, child dedication services, using the creeds and confessions in corporate worship, how to preach Ecclesiastes, and a hilarious, 9-year-old caption creator for the New Yorker. Enjoy!